SHARE Repository

Psychopathy and the Polygraph: Investigating Implicit Bias in Deception Detection

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Norwood, Jessica Danae
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-18T23:31:17Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-18T23:31:17Z
dc.date.issued 2017-05
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12087/12
dc.description A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology en_US
dc.description.abstract A technological shortcut to the truth is one of the many portrayals that refer to what is known as the polygraph. This study is the third to examine the validity and accuracy of the polygraph in a non-clinical and non-criminal psychopathic and non-psychopathic (N = 36) sample. Possessing limited capacity for anxiety, guilt, or shame, psychopathic individuals tend to be non-reactive to specific stimuli; this asserts the notion that they may be able to “beat” a polygraph. Results broadly support researchers’ hypothesis: There was a significant relationship between possessing psychopathic traits and the increased probability of passing a polygraph exam. There was also a unique association with the severity of psychopathy and passing a polygraph examination. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject Psychology en_US
dc.subject Criminology en_US
dc.subject Physiology en_US
dc.subject Psychopathy en_US
dc.title Psychopathy and the Polygraph: Investigating Implicit Bias in Deception Detection en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search


Browse

My Account