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Law Enforcement Perceived Stress, Job Satisfaction, and Burnout

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dc.contributor.author Akwaboah, Paula N.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-15T22:24:24Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-15T22:24:24Z
dc.date.issued 2017-05
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12087/5
dc.description A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology en_US
dc.description.abstract Law enforcement is widely known as one of the most demanding and unpredictable occupations, and one where extensive job stress and burnout put law enforcement officers’ mental and physical health at further risk. This study examined months on the job as an officer, organizational support, and gender differences as predictors of burnout and job satisfaction. As predicted, months on the job as an officer lead to job burnout and organizational support lead to job satisfaction. Furthermore, the findings also revealed that there were no differences between male and female perceived officer stress. Several research implications and suggestions of the findings are discussed. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Mental Health en_US
dc.subject Law Enforcement en_US
dc.subject Job Satisfaction en_US
dc.subject Stress en_US
dc.subject Burnout en_US
dc.subject Psychology en_US
dc.title Law Enforcement Perceived Stress, Job Satisfaction, and Burnout en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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